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  #71  
Unread 05-25-2021, 12:16 AM
Tim McGrath Tim McGrath is offline
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Rhyming is a gift like any other. Shakespeare was a great rhymer who only occasionally resorted to off-rhymes. John Claire was also a good rhymer. Bob Dylan too. As Johnny Cash once said, he can rhyme the tick of time. So could Emily Dickinson, but sometimes, out of perversity, she would rhyme tick with tock, which is cute, but no poem that has imperfect rhymes can be considered perfect. ED was not a perfectionist, but she often achieved perfection without even trying. Few stanzas written by anyone are as purely poetic as this, an ode to the Civil War dead:

They dropped like flakes,
They dropped like stars,
Like petals from a rose
When suddenly across the June
A wind with fingers goes.

Last edited by Tim McGrath; 05-25-2021 at 01:14 AM.
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  #72  
Unread 05-25-2021, 08:41 AM
John Riley John Riley is online now
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Yes, it was "cute" because it didn't represent facile notions of superficial perfection.
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  #73  
Unread 05-25-2021, 09:02 AM
Roger Slater Roger Slater is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim McGrath View Post
no poem that has imperfect rhymes can be considered perfect
It depends who is doing the considering, I suppose. Your view is not widely shared.
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  #74  
Unread 05-26-2021, 08:50 PM
Tim McGrath Tim McGrath is offline
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As someone who was practiced in the art of self-denial, Dickinson was capable of intentionally sabotaging her poems.

Some overreaching Dickinson scholars find meaning in whether one of her dashes is slanted up or down. If a dash is meant to be a pause, then it disrupts the 4/3 meter that Dickinson so loved.

Statistically, her capitalizations are randomly distributed. Take, for example, the word "night." She uses it 150 times and capitalizes it 60. Which means that she capitalized at whim.

A poem is not a visual production. A poem, like a mathematical object, exists in a realm beyond the paper it is printed on.

Yes, I am a Platonist.

Last edited by Tim McGrath; 05-26-2021 at 09:18 PM.
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  #75  
Unread 05-27-2021, 07:26 AM
mignon ledgard mignon ledgard is offline
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Default The thread on Emily Dickinson

I'm enjoying this thread and wish there were more illumination thrown in from those who know her work best.

However, this line gives me pause:

"Statistically, her capitalizations are randomly distributed. Take, for example, the word "night." She uses it 150 times and capitalizes it 60. Which means that she capitalized at whim."--
Especially, the conclusion drawn: "Which means that she capitalized at whim." Even if it were true, it would still be a 'false' conclusion: a conjencture.

That she did not always capitalized does not 'mean' that she did so 'at whim.'

Come on, Tim! Numbers prove no such thing. I say this confidently because the same could be said of my poems, while I always have a reason when I do capitalize a common noun--not that I always wish to divulge it.

I'm beginning to think this is more like a truncated game for which rules and a board have not yet been procured.

Last edited by mignon ledgard; 05-27-2021 at 11:59 AM. Reason: a typo pulled me in.
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  #76  
Unread 05-27-2021, 08:43 AM
Roger Slater Roger Slater is offline
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"As someone who was practiced in the art of self-denial, Dickinson was capable of intentionally sabotaging her poems."

You're getting very bizarre here. Emily Dickinson sabatoged her own poems and now we have Tim, who claims to love Dickinson's poems as much as anyone, doing a statistical analysis to save Emily from her own self-destructive impulses and whims. This is right out of the Twilight Zone.
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  #77  
Unread 05-27-2021, 09:16 AM
Max Goodman Max Goodman is offline
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Tim, you're free to read and create as you please, but you sound ridiculous making rules for others and proving that Emily Dickinson didn't do what she did.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim McGrath View Post
A poem is not a visual production.
Thanks for correcting my lying eyes.
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  #78  
Unread 05-30-2021, 06:48 AM
W T Clark W T Clark is offline
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You have the mind of a nineteenth-century publisher, Tim.
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  #79  
Unread 05-30-2021, 01:38 PM
Tim McGrath Tim McGrath is offline
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Yes, I do. I am the love child of Mabel Loomis Todd and Thomas Wentworth Higginson.
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